Archives for posts with tag: CD release

The one-year anniversary of the official release of my debut CD is coming up on April 26* so I thought I’d lead up to it by blowing the eDust off the blog and by writing a few facts on each of the 14 tracks of The Learning Days, which, almost 365 days later, I still listen to with unbridled, self-gratifying glee.

So first up, track 1, Melancholia (approaching).

This track is named after the exquisite Lars von Trier movie which I loved and felt captured a lot of what Blue Blue Satellite is all about: emotional fragility, contemplating life, and of course, colossal mystery planets colliding with Earth extinguishing all life as we know it.

I liked the idea of opening the record with a super-simple musical motif that would cause listeners to think “ok…I wonder where he’s going with this”. And what is a simpler motif than: “E – E – E – E…”? Well, perhaps “C – C – C – C – C…” but sometimes you just have to live your life on the edge, baby.

The way the track bleeds into track 2 was something I always wanted to do. Hopefully the listeners get slightly tripped out because the aforementioned “E – E – E – E…” of the piano goes from being on the first beat of the bar to…uh, not the first beat. I’m pretty proud of having come up with the idea. That is, the idea of stealing it from here, here and here. Please don’t tell Emma, Noel or Jónsi. Because I’ll know who ratted me out, all 3 of you who read this blog….

E – E – E – E – E ….

Blue Blue Satellite

* I had my official CD release show in Ottawa on April 26, 2012. Coincidentally, on April 26th, 2013I’ll be accompanying L.A.’s best kept secret, Sara Melson, at the release party for her highly recommended new CD and who I’ll blog about when I get to track 7, Sister Rachel. Stay tuned.

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For many moons now, I’ve always claimed to be a songwriter first and foremost. Not a singer, not a guitarist, not a CD pushing self-promoter, but a songwriter.

My Ottawa CD release made me realize that this is a false claim.

Almost all of the elements that made me very satisfied with the Ottawa CD release were not song-related. For example:

  • Taking the stage to a projected visual intro with an accompanying instrumental piece.
  • The uninterrupted, three-song, no banter set of songs to kick off the show
  • The un-amplified mandolin song while walking into the audience
  • Having a backing band for Thieves but having them take the stage halfway through the first chorus:

    (impatient? go to 1:26)

There were more but I can’t reveal all my performance secrets now can I(especially since most of them are stolen)? But therein lies the keyword: “performance”. It turns out that while I still consider myself a songwriter, the performer in me is just as strong. Maybe even slightly stronger. And this can be heard on the record as well. Every element, every transition, every nuance that pushes the CD or live show beyond a simple collection of 14 songs: this is performance.

So why is this important to me? I guess I’ve become very aware of my audience whether they’re at a show or reclining with headphones  on at home. As a songwriter, my job is to write a song. Ok. Check. But as a performer, my job is to give the audience a fresh experience that will resonate with them; make them come for the music but stay for the experience…which I hope I succeeded in doing at the Ottawa CD release.

I’m still very much a songwriter. But now I’m adding the performer aspect. I suppose it marks an evolution in me, but it begs the questions: what is it that I am evolving into…?

An artist.

Thieves

Thieves @ Gallery Studios

Blue Blue Satellite

I really thought I was keeping the Toronto pre-release show pretty simple. And I believed this right up to a few days before showtime. Although I probably should have known better as I left my apartment in Ottawa.

It's schleptacular!

What I should have known was that I had to coordinate the set up of a rental P.A. system, a slideshow intro for two performers, that two out-of-town couples were well taken care of, three never-before-used stomp boxes, lighting logistics, a constantly changing guestlist and of course, the worst weather(or weather warning) of the season. Add to this the fact that I was trying to deal with these details with a shirt, tie, sweater and fitted faux-leather bomber jacket on, and it was quite the ordeal. Albeit a very fashion forward ordeal.

So what began as a musical extravaganza featuring a few bells and whistles became The Bells and Whistles Super Stress Show, featuring a bit of music. But that’s okay because the music served an oasis of calm in the middle of gigzilla. I was hardly nervous at all and yes, technical glitches did occur but I tried and hope I succeeded in moving past all of it with professionalism to deliver an entertaining show.

It was fun to be a headliner for the first time and to have a class-act like Kristine St-Pierre be my opening special guest. It was also fun to call her up during the encores à la George and Elton in “Don’t Let the Sun Go Down On Me.” Also, the beauty and uniqueness of the venue helped distract the audience from, oh, say, daisy chained pedals disconnecting from each other in mid-air and crashing to the unforgiving floor with the even more unforgiving PA system amplifying the cacophony as if to say “Hey Blue, maybe plan a little better next time, yeah?

Nonetheless, the things people actually said to me at the end of the night was just all kinds of nice and made me feel like it was all worthwhile. And you know what? It was. Even if the grand piano’s supports had given out and crushed my legs and carefully colour-coordinated pants, it would have been worth it. Because having your own professionally produced debut CD, releasing it in your hometown to attentive, close friends and family and hearing their words of praise, encouragement and support can only make you strive onwards and upwards.

Thank you attendees. It was my humble honour to share some music with you for an evening. We’ll do it again. Soon.

Blue Blue Satellite